Shelves

AS I AM NOW CO-HOSTING EXPLORING MY BOOKS WITH ADDLEPATES AND BOOK NERDS, OUR TOPIC THIS WEEK IS

Trilogies

I feel as if trilogies have always been a great way to share a story, while still keeping it relatively short. While I have read numerous trilogies over the years, I only own the complete trilogy of a few. The first of which is the Gemma Doyle trilogy by Libba Bray.  The books in this trilogy are A Great and Terrible Beauty, Rebel Angels, and The Sweet Far Thing. (The last book is shown more in the background of the other two in the picture below. I was in a rush this morning to photograph these that I didn’t want to tumble my book stacks.) I read this series in High School and enjoyed it. I vaguely remember this one, the only thing that I recall is that it is a bit scary. Another trilogy I own (as well as most of the country probably) is The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. The books in this series are The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay. This series was very addicting and made some amazing movies as well. In addition to these two trilogies I also own the Inkworld series by Cornelia Funke, but I didn’t have the time to photograph it. Aside from that I mostly own a bunch of standalone novels and long series.

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A Great and Terrible Beauty BY Libba Bray

From Goodreads

“A Victorian boarding school story, a Gothic mansion mystery, a gossipy romp about a clique of girlfriends, and a dark other-worldly fantasy—jumble them all together and you have this complicated and unusual first novel.

Sixteen-year-old Gemma has had an unconventional upbringing in India, until the day she foresees her mother’s death in a black, swirling vision that turns out to be true. Sent back to England, she is enrolled at Spence, a girls’ academy with a mysterious burned-out East Wing. There Gemma is snubbed by powerful Felicity, beautiful Pippa, and even her own dumpy roommate Ann, until she blackmails herself and Ann into the treacherous clique. Gemma is distressed to find that she has been followed from India by Kartik, a beautiful young man who warns her to fight off the visions. Nevertheless, they continue, and one night she is led by a child-spirit to find a diary that reveals the secrets of a mystical Order. The clique soon finds a way to accompany Gemma to the other-world realms of her visions “for a bit of fun” and to taste the power they will never have as Victorian wives, but they discover that the delights of the realms are overwhelmed by a menace they cannot control. Gemma is left with the knowledge that her role as the link between worlds leaves her with a mission to seek out the “others” and rebuild the Order.”

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The Hunger Games BY Suzanne Collins

From Goodreads

Winning will make you famous.
Losing means certain death.

The nation of Panem, formed from a post-apocalyptic North America, is a country that consists of a wealthy Capitol region surrounded by 12 poorer districts. Early in its history, a rebellion led by a 13th district against the Capitol resulted in its destruction and the creation of an annual televised event known as the Hunger Games. In punishment, and as a reminder of the power and grace of the Capitol, each district must yield one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 through a lottery system to participate in the games. The ‘tributes’ are chosen during the annual Reaping and are forced to fight to the death, leaving only one survivor to claim victory.

When 16-year-old Katniss’s young sister, Prim, is selected as District 12’s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart Peeta, are pitted against bigger, stronger representatives, some of whom have trained for this their whole lives. , she sees it as a death sentence. But Katniss has been close to death before. For her, survival is second nature.

 How many Trilogies do you own?

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To participate in the Exploring Your Bookshelf meme hosted by Addlepates and Bookworms and myself, here’s what you do:

  1. Post a picture of your bookshelf (preferably literal, but e-shelves work too).
  2. We’ll give you something about your shelf to write about. It might be your favourite cover, your favourite author, your book you most recently bought etc.
  3. Then give us the blurb and the cover of the book (and what you thought of it if you’ve read it)
  4. And finally, come back to one of our posts and send us a link! We promise to check out all of your posts!
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