Agamemnon


Aeschylus

When I typically pick up a text of this nature I cringe on the inside because of how hard I’ll have to read to be able to understand what the author intends. Examples of this cringing occur when reading “The Iliad”, “The Odyssey”, and “The Aeneid”. This tale was different for me, I’m assuming it must be because it was translated well. The story was easy to follow and intriguing. Some quotes that stood out are below.

“May good prevail! So be it! And yet, what is good? And who is god? How should we name him and speak true?…” pg. 16 (Chorus)

These questions are still prevalent today. I don’t struggle so much with the god one, but with “what is good”. How do we know what is good, gut feelings? Some people have gut feelings for murder, are they good if that correlated to their faith and what they believe?

“Man must suffer to be wise” pg. 17 (Chorus)

This is true, at least for me. Essentially it means that we learn from our mistakes

“Alas for human destiny! Man’s happiest hours are pictures drawn in shadow. Then ill fortune comes, and with two strokes the wet sponge wipes the image out. And grief itself is hardly more pitiable than joy.” pg. 56 (Cassandra)

I feel this quote means that life is short. As well as that one major fault, or mistake, can negate all accomplishments and victories.

“Where, where lies Right? Reason despairs her powers. Mind numbly gropes, her quick resources spent.” pg. 63 (Chorus)

This is a challenge that one comes across all the time, even now. What is right? who has what rights and why? Politics relates greatly to this matter. For example, in the current political battle between Obama and Romney, Obama want everyone to pay an equal percentage on their taxes, to the common middle class and below this makes perfect sense. Why right do people with more money than me have to pay a lower percentage? Romney, a millionaire, disagrees, most likely because him paying equal taxes will mean he gets one less yacht. Enough with my political rant.

I really enjoyed reading this story. With it being written as a play it was up to my imagination what the characters were doing on stage.

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